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Using Quail Eggs #1 – Boiling and Shelling

One of the important upsides of keeping quail is that you get a daily harvest of clean, fresh eggs. Nutritionally, they are no different to eggs from chickens – and they can be prepared and eaten in all of the same ways as you do with chicken eggs. One obvious...

Japanese Quail #7 – the Post Mortem

Incubation is about hatch percentages – and every unhatched egg is an opportunity to review (and improve upon) your management practices  Any competent incubator operator should be able to conduct a basic post mortem examination of the unhatched eggs. Incubated...

Japanese Quail #6 – Analysing the Hatch

The hatch commenced some time prior to 6.00am yesterday – by which time, we had 8 chicks.   By nightfall, the numbers looked to be around 25 chicks.    I ended the hatch at 7.00am on Thursday 2nd May – number remain unchanged from 25. Theoretically, we...

Japanese Quail #5 – Hatching Chicks

The hatch is underway. My partner Jan drew my attention to the fact that “there is somethin’ happening in the incubator” at 6.00am this morning – and she was right.  The first 8 or 10 chicks were staggering about drying off. Last night, some...

Japanese Quail #4 – Care of Fertile Eggs

In Japanese Quail #3, we looked at the incubator in terms of its role, its component parts and how it works. When it comes to producing healthy viable chicks, however, the incubator is only part of the process – so it’s appropriate that we give some...

Japanese Quail #3 – The Incubator

Natural incubation, in a quail or chicken context, occurs when the fertile eggs from a hen (or hens) are gathered into a nest……whereupon the hen places herself.  Genetically-wired to manage the whole process, the hen will spend the next 16 to 21 days...